November 23, 2017

Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware

Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


Whenever I get a chance to use transferware on the table, I take it.

Transferware pairs nicely with Tartan/Plaid.

What is the difference between Plaid and Tartan?

  They are both made of woven threads intersecting at 90 degrees.  

For the cloth to be a Tartan, the pattern running vertically is exactly repeated in the pattern going horizontally.  There can be any number of different coloured threads in the pattern.

The original Tartans were made into the traditional clothes worn by the Scottish Clans and these patterns can be thousands of years old.  Each Clan has its own Tartan.


Set the Table - Tartan and Transferware



A plaid actually refers to a blanket-like garment worn tucked in at the waist and thrown over the left shoulder.  It is made from Tartan.

What we refer to as plaid today is cloth inspired by the original Tartans.  They are woven in the same way and most of the time the pattern is identical, both vertically and horizontally.

Plaids are not Tartans because they are not original patterns from the Scottish Clans or they have not been registered as Tartans.  
The Scottish Register of Tartans


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


None of the three different plaids on this table are actually Tartans.


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


The napkin rings are small reindeer made from welded pieces of metal.

I do like that plaids and tartans can be mixed together without clashing.

We can do this as long as one or two of the colours are repeated in each pattern.






Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


We set the table using a plaid table runner.


On top of the runner is a galvanised metal bucket holding a small tree.

The salt and pepper are made from wood and resemble white birch trees.

These contribute to the woodsy theme we were hoping to create.


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


Pinecones and berries and some burlap surrounding the tree bring the outdoors indoors.


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


Red wine glasses fit easily into the red and green colour theme.


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware




Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


The plate stack consists of a wood charger, Denver Plaid dinner plate, Old Britain Castles dinner plate, Denver Plaid salad plate.


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


This is the Old Britain Castles dinner plate.

Although the napkins look the same as the table runner, they are a different plaid.



Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware




Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware




Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware




Set the Table - Tartan and Transferware


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


A stack of Old Britain Castles salad plates waits at the side.


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware




A List of Table Elements

The runner is fabric purchased from Fabricland last year.
Wood chargers, The Great Canadian Superstore two years ago.
Cutlery, Bombay
Denver Plaid plates, Pottery Barn
Old Britain Castles, Johnson Brothers
Napkins, Home Sense a couple of years ago
Wine glasses, thrift store find
Reindeer napkin rings, Kitchen Stuff Plus a few years ago.




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This is an original Fair Meadow Place Publication.





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November 20, 2017

DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks

DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks

This is the time of the year to go out and collect fallen pinecones and dry sticks.

There are a number of uses for these harvested pieces of nature, but, today I am going to tell you how to frost them yourself.


Materials List

Dry pinecones and sticks 
White Spray paint
White School Glue or any glue that dries clear. This is the one I used
Epsom Salts - available at drug stores.
Small Container and a small, old Paint Brush
Water
A foil covered tray
Clear Matte or Semi-gloss spray paint HERE



DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


If the pinecones are wet, you may have to prepare them by drying them.  See this post Collecting & Using Pinecones for information on preparing the pinecones.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


Once the pinecones are ready for use, you can lightly spray them with the white paint and let dry.

In a small container, squirt a small amount of white glue and add some water.  Mix the glue and water together.
You want the glue to be the consistency of milk otherwise it will be too thick.

Paint the glue and water mixture onto the pinecones and sticks in sections.

While holding the stick or pinecone over the tray, pour or spoon the Epsom salts over the wet glue.  It is easier to work in sections.  The Epsom salts left on the tray can be scooped up and used again.

Set the pinecones and sticks aside to dry.

Once they are dry, lightly spray with Clear Matte finish.  The clear coat helps to stop the Epsom salts from falling off and makes the sticks and pinecones easier to handle.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


Some of the pinecones I didn't paint, like the one above.  I like both looks.



DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


It is easy to incorporate the pinecones and sticks into seasonal arrangements.

They can be placed into an arrangement or wired in using florists wire.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks




DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


I have a collection of old Crown canning jars with lids.  They belonged to my mother.

I removed the glass tops and left the screw-on caps on the jars.

Using some string, I tied a couple of pinecones on to the tops of the jars and added a few clippings of cedar and boxwood.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


I placed a few cuttings in the bottom of each jar and added a tea light.

Battery powered tea lights would be safer than tea lights to use, especially if you are using them as gifts.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


 Frosting pinecones are such an easy craft and it moves along quite quickly.  My 8-year-old granddaughter loved it.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


I can't decide if I like the painted version...


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


or the unpainted version.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks



Thanks for stopping by.



This is an original Fair Meadow Place Publication.


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November 16, 2017

Cutting Board Makeover




Cutting Board Makeover


When I found this cutting board at the thrift store, I knew it wouldn't take a lot to restore and update it.


Cutting Board Makeover


It wasn't in bad shape, but it was dirty and there was a build-up of grease on it.



Cutting Board Makeover


It had plain, utilitarian white feet.  The bottom of the board was dirty from the hands that had used it.

I used a palm sander with 80 Grit sandpaper to remove all the old dirt and grease.

I used bleach in a sink of water and then let the board soak for an hour.

I rinsed the board and let it dry overnight.

I then used 220 Grit sandpaper to finish off the sanding.

The end result, as shown below, was very smooth, exposed raw wood.




Cutting Board Makeover



I used four unfinished wood drawer pulls as feet.   I found them here: Wood Drawer Pulls

I fastened my new feet with Hanger Bolts that I found here:  HERE.

I had to drill out the holes in the board and in the drawer pulls in order to make them large enough to accommodate the hanger bolts.

I screwed the bolts into the board and then screwed the feet on to the bolts.



Cutting Board Makeover


Next, I waxed the board and feet with Board wax as shown below.

You can find the same wax.  It is called Orange Wax at Lee Valley Tools.


Cutting Board Makeover


I left the wax on overnight to soak in.  In the morning the board was buffed with a soft cloth.


Cutting Board Makeover


Finally, ceramic drawer pulls were added as handles.  They were marked down to $1.98 each and found HERE

The bolts on the ceramic drawer pulls were replaced with long wood screws. The exposed ends of the screws were painted with Antique Brass paint.


 Cutting Board Makeover



Almost all of the knife marks were removed with sanding.

I could have used a wood stain and sealer, but, I decided that I wanted to put food directly on the surface of the board.

Non-toxic wood wax for use on boards and bowls was the perfect solution.



Cutting Board Makeover



The board has a new life.

It can be used as either a serving piece, as I am using it, or it could be used as a chopping block for meat or vegetables.


Cutting Board Makeover


I do believe I will enjoy this board for many years.


Cutting Board Makeover



The cost of the project was a fraction of the cost of a new board.



Cutting Board Makeover



Here is the Link for information about The Care & Cleaning of Wood Boards & Bowls.



Thank you for stopping by.



This is an original Fair Meadow Place Publication.




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November 09, 2017

Collecting & Using Pinecones



Collecting & Using Pinecones


Fall is the perfect time of year to collect pinecones.  Most of them have fallen from the trees making it easy to collect them.

When it comes to debugging the pinecones, I never wash them.  If it is damp or the ground is wet, the pinecones will close up.  Similarly, once they are placed in water, they will close.  The bugs will stay inside until the cones open again.

I wash them only if they are dirty.


Collecting & Using Pinecones


All of the collected pinecones are placed on a foil-lined or parchment-lined baking sheet and put in a 200-degree oven for approximately two hours.  Two hours are usually enough, but they can stay in longer if necessary.

I don't believe any bug can live beyond a good baking.


Collecting & Using Pinecones


I open the oven from time to time to check on them.  As the cones start to open, I stand them upright so that they bake more evenly.



Collecting & Using Pinecones


Some cones will not open or only partially open.  I can't explain why that happens.   If it does happen that some don't open remember that pinecones make good mulch in the garden.  


Collecting & Using Pinecones


The green pinecone opened.  It has a slightly lighter colour than the others.



Collecting & Using Pinecones


Different trees produce differently shaped cones.

The cone at the top left was one I found on a trip to the Caribbean.  The tree appeared to be some sort of pine tree, but when I brought the cone home and checked to find out what it was, it turned out not to be a pine tree at all.  It is a Casuarina tree.

I will still be using these small and unusual cones in my seasonal decorating, though.

Spruce trees, cedar trees, as well as different varieties of pine trees produce cones.  They are worth checking out.


Collecting & Using Pinecones


In another post, I will be talking about my method for frosting pinecones and ways to incorporate them into your seasonal decor.



Collecting & Using Pinecones


Thank you for stopping by.


This is an original Fair Meadow Place Publication.




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