December 10, 2017

Fair Meadow Place Bookshelf - Christmas Book List







I've been doing some reading and I have also added some books to the list that I haven't read, yet.

I have not included any children's books as I am not up-to-date on the crop of books available this year for the younger set.



My  first, second, and third choices are by an English author, Ruth Ware.

Her first novel,  In a Dark, Dark Wood I have not read yet.  I bought it along with the second novel The Woman in Cabin 10.

I read The Woman in Cabin 10 and thoroughly enjoyed it.  It is a mystery that takes place at Sea.  It is a real page-turner.

In this book, Ruth Ware writes in a style reminiscent of Agatha Christie, but the era in which she writes is current.


                                                     The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware



I will be reading In a Dark, Dark Wood soon.

I read a preview of the third book, The Lying Game, and it promises to be equally as good as The Woman in Cabin 10.


Right now a boxed set of all three novels is available.


Ruth Ware Box Set: In a Dark, Dark Wood; The Woman in Cabin 10; The Lying Game by Ruth Ware

                                       



My fourth choice is Paris 1919, by Margaret MacMillan.  This isn't a new book.  It has been around for a few years.

This is an ideal book for history buffs as it recalls the events that took place at the Paris Peace Conference post WW1.

The book recounts decisions made in 1919 and how those decisions affected the world from that time.   Decisions made in 1919 still affect the world today from WW2 to unrest in the middle east, to ISIS.

This is the book I am curretly reading and it is fascinating.


Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed The World by Margaret Macmillan




Enjoy reading and thank you for stopping by.



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December 06, 2017

Fireplace Before and After




We have been getting ready for Christmas at the city house, but, have managed to get side-tracked with a couple of projects.

I wanted a new look for the fireplace and decided to paint it.

Below is the Before picture.


There is only one window in this room so there is not too much light.  We also have some dark wood furniture pieces.

It is time to lighten up.




I am so happy with the results.





Below are the products I used.



I used a custom mix of Rustoleum Chalked Linen White and Aged Grey paint.

It took two coats to cover the dark stain.

I finished it with one coat of Rustoleum Chalked Matte Clear to protect the paint.


You can find this line of products HEREHERE, and HERE.

I find this brand easy to use and easy to clean up with water.

They sell a range of pre-mixed colours or dark and light tint bases for custom colours.

They also sell spray Chalked paints as well as waxes for finishing.





The drying time between coats is about two hours so I was able to complete the two coats of paint plus the Matte Clear all on the same day.






Thank you for stopping by.


This is a Fair Meadow Place original Fireplace Before and After publication.




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November 29, 2017

Set the Table - Merry Jingle Bells




There is something about a Red and White table at Christmas that looks so clean and bright.

These two colours make each other sing.





White charger, Red dinner plate, White salad plate on a foundation of White with Red stripes tea towelling for table runners.




Red & White script napkins doubled up with White pompom napkins.

Holding both napkins together, a red jingle bell napkin ring.




On each plate, an oversized Red jingle bell and red-handled flatware stand at the ready.








Place settings are accompanied by a Santa cup, each one with a different facial expression.




A string of red wooden beads meanders down the centre of the table.










The centrepiece was easy.  A very old white Ironstone bowl was filled with fresh clippings from evergreen trees, frosted pinecones, and red Christmas ornaments.




White candlesticks hold white candles that are wrapped in red and white striped ribbon.










Some of the Elements on the Table

Table Runners - Tea Towelling purchased at Fabricland
Red-handled Flatware - B&B from Home Sense
White Chargers - Walmart
Red Dinner Plates - HERE
White Salad Plates - Richmond by Johnson Bros.
Jingle Bells and striped ribbon - Michael's
Red & White Sentiment Napkins - HERE
White pompom napkins - Bowrings
Napkin Rings - HERE
Santa Figural Mugs - Pottery Barn
Saucers - Richmond by Johnson Bros.
Candle Sticks - Skye McGhie
Red beads and White bowl - I have had them for many years.
DIY Frosted Pinecones - HERE




Thank you for stopping by.



This is a Fair Meadow Place, Set the Table - Merry Jingle Bells Original Publication.



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November 23, 2017

Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware

Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


Whenever I get a chance to use transferware on the table, I take it.

Transferware pairs nicely with Tartan/Plaid.

What is the difference between Plaid and Tartan?

  They are both made of woven threads intersecting at 90 degrees.  

For the cloth to be a Tartan, the pattern running vertically is exactly repeated in the pattern going horizontally.  There can be any number of different coloured threads in the pattern.

The original Tartans were made into the traditional clothes worn by the Scottish Clans and these patterns can be thousands of years old.  Each Clan has its own Tartan.


Set the Table - Tartan and Transferware



A plaid actually refers to a blanket-like garment worn tucked in at the waist and thrown over the left shoulder.  It is made from Tartan.

What we refer to as plaid today is cloth inspired by the original Tartans.  They are woven in the same way and most of the time the pattern is identical, both vertically and horizontally.

Plaids are not Tartans because they are not original patterns from the Scottish Clans or they have not been registered as Tartans.  
The Scottish Register of Tartans


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


None of the three different plaids on this table are actually Tartans.


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


The napkin rings are small reindeer made from welded pieces of metal.

I do like that plaids and tartans can be mixed together without clashing.

We can do this as long as one or two of the colours are repeated in each pattern.






Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


We set the table using a plaid table runner.


On top of the runner is a galvanised metal bucket holding a small tree.

The salt and pepper are made from wood and resemble white birch trees.

These contribute to the woodsy theme we were hoping to create.


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


Pinecones and berries and some burlap surrounding the tree bring the outdoors indoors.


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


Red wine glasses fit easily into the red and green colour theme.


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware




Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


The plate stack consists of a wood charger, Denver Plaid dinner plate, Old Britain Castles dinner plate, Denver Plaid salad plate.


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


This is the Old Britain Castles dinner plate.

Although the napkins look the same as the table runner, they are a different plaid.



Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware




Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware




Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware




Set the Table - Tartan and Transferware


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware


A stack of Old Britain Castles salad plates waits at the side.


Set the Table - Tartan & Transferware




A List of Table Elements

The runner is fabric purchased from Fabricland last year.
Wood chargers, The Great Canadian Superstore two years ago.
Cutlery, Bombay
Denver Plaid plates, Pottery Barn
Old Britain Castles, Johnson Brothers
Napkins, Home Sense a couple of years ago
Wine glasses, thrift store find
Reindeer napkin rings, Kitchen Stuff Plus a few years ago.




Thank you for stopping by.


This is an original Fair Meadow Place Publication.





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November 20, 2017

DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks

DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks

This is the time of the year to go out and collect fallen pinecones and dry sticks.

There are a number of uses for these harvested pieces of nature, but, today I am going to tell you how to frost them yourself.


Materials List

Dry pinecones and sticks 
White Spray paint
White School Glue or any glue that dries clear. This is the one I used
Epsom Salts - available at drug stores.
Small Container and a small, old Paint Brush
Water
A foil covered tray
Clear Matte or Semi-gloss spray paint HERE



DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


If the pinecones are wet, you may have to prepare them by drying them.  See this post Collecting & Using Pinecones for information on preparing the pinecones.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


Once the pinecones are ready for use, you can lightly spray them with the white paint and let dry.

In a small container, squirt a small amount of white glue and add some water.  Mix the glue and water together.
You want the glue to be the consistency of milk otherwise it will be too thick.

Paint the glue and water mixture onto the pinecones and sticks in sections.

While holding the stick or pinecone over the tray, pour or spoon the Epsom salts over the wet glue.  It is easier to work in sections.  The Epsom salts left on the tray can be scooped up and used again.

Set the pinecones and sticks aside to dry.

Once they are dry, lightly spray with Clear Matte finish.  The clear coat helps to stop the Epsom salts from falling off and makes the sticks and pinecones easier to handle.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


Some of the pinecones I didn't paint, like the one above.  I like both looks.



DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


It is easy to incorporate the pinecones and sticks into seasonal arrangements.

They can be placed into an arrangement or wired in using florists wire.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks




DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


I have a collection of old Crown canning jars with lids.  They belonged to my mother.

I removed the glass tops and left the screw-on caps on the jars.

Using some string, I tied a couple of pinecones on to the tops of the jars and added a few clippings of cedar and boxwood.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


I placed a few cuttings in the bottom of each jar and added a tea light.

Battery powered tea lights would be safer than tea lights to use, especially if you are using them as gifts.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


 Frosting pinecones are such an easy craft and it moves along quite quickly.  My 8-year-old granddaughter loved it.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


I can't decide if I like the painted version...


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks


or the unpainted version.


DIY Frosted Pinecones & Sticks



Thanks for stopping by.



This is an original Fair Meadow Place Publication.


The best way to see our posts is by email subscription. SUBSCRIBE HERE 

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It really makes our day when we hear from you so please leave comments below. 

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